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IMMUNOLOGY 2010?
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Baltimore Convention Center:
Charles Street Lobby & Mezzanine
 


Oriole Park at Camden Yards

 

 


Renaissance Baltimore
Harborplace Hotel

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AAI PROGRAM

Except where noted, sessions are at the Baltimore Convention Center (BCC).

President's Program    |    Distinguished Lectures    |    Major Symposia
Awards    |    Award Lectures
Business Meeting & Awards Presentations
Social Events    |    Committee-Sponsored Sessions
NIH Institute-Sponsored Sessions     |     Guest Society Symposia
Career Development Sessions     |     exhibitor workshops
Block Symposia    |    Poster Sessions    |    Exhibitor Product Showcase
 
Itinerary Planner
 

AAI PRESIDENT'S PROGRAM


Dr. Diamond

AAI PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS
Friday, May 7, 5:00 PM
BCC Ballroom I & II

Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Antibodies and the brain: lessons from lupus


Matthew D. Scharff, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Introduction

AAI PRESIDENT'S SYMPOSIUM AND PRESENTATION OF
AAI EXCELLENCE IN MENTORING AWARD

Monday, May 10, 2:30 PM
BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
AAI Excellence in Mentoring Award
Award Recipient: Jack L. Strominger
Harvard University
Hidde Ploegh, MIT, Introduction
The AAI Excellence in Mentoring Award recognizes an AAI member's exemplary career contributions to a future generation of scientists. The award will be presented prior to the start of the AAI President's Symposium.

Dr. Strominger
 
AAI PRESIDENT'S SYMPOSIUM NEURAL AND IMMUNE INTERACTIONS: A NEW FRONTIER
Monday, May 10,  2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
BCC Ballroom I and II
Chair
:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Kevin J. Tracey, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Reflex control of immunity
Britta Engelhardt, University of Bern, How immune cells enter the central nervous system: anatomical pathways and molecular cues
Madeleine W. Cunningham, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Molecular mimicry in the immune system: effects on the brain
Lawrence Steinman, Stanford University, Biomarkers guide patient selection for targeting innate or adaptive immunity in multiple sclerosis

Dr. Tracey

Dr. Engelhardt

Dr. Cunningham

Dr. Steinman

AAI DISTINGUISHED LECTURES

Generously supported by eBioscience, Inc.
DISTINGUISHED LECTURE AND PRESENTATION OF AAI LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Saturday, May 8, 5:00 PM BCC Ballroom I & II
AAI Lifetime Achievement Award
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Susan L. Swain, Trudeau Institute
The AAI Lifetime Achievement Award is the highest honor bestowed by the AAI Council upon an AAI member. This award recognizes a deserving member for a career of scientific achievement and for contributions to AAI and fellow immunologists. The award will be presented prior to the start of Alan Shers AAI Distinguished Lecture.


Dr. Swain

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE
Alan Sher, NIAID, NIH
Learning immunoregulation from parasites

Sunday, May 9, 5:00 PM BCC Ballroom I & II
Pamela S. Ohashi, University of Toronto
Breaking T cell tolerance to tissue/tumor antigens: a perspective

Monday, May 10, 5:00 PM BCC Ballroom I & II
Mitchell Kronenberg, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology
Natural killer T cells ignite the immune response to microbes by acting like innate immune cells
Dedicated to the memory of Eli Sercarz

AAI MAJOR SYMPOSIA
 
Saturday
May 8
 
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM
BCC Ballroom I

  

Major Symposium A Immunoimaging: Visualizing the Immune Response in Real-Time by Multiphoton Microscopy
Chair: Michael D. Cahalan, University of California, Irvine
Co-chair: Matthew F. Krummel, University of California, San Francisco
Michael D. Cahalan, University of California, Irvine, There and back again: immunoimaging in peripheral tissue and in lymphoid organs
Matthew F. Krummel
, University of California, San Francisco, Visualization of effective and defective antigen presentation in vivo
Ronald N. Germain, NIAID, NIH, Connecting the dots: dynamic in situ analysis of innate and adaptive immunity using intravital 2-photon microscopy
Ellen A. Robey
, University of California, Berkeley, Imaging of T cells and thymocytes in action using 2-photon microscopy
Mark J. Miller
, Washington University School of Medicine, Regulation of leukocyte trafficking in mouse models of inflammation and infection
Thorsten R. Mempel, Massachusetts General Hospital, T cell migration and function during an anti-tumor immune response

Saturday
May 8
  
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM
BCC Ballroom II


  

Major Symposium B Follicular Helper T Cells: Lineage and Function
Chair: Michael G. McHeyzer-Williams, Scripps Research Institute
Co-chair: Carola G. Vinuesa, Australian National University
Shane Crotty, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Follicular helper CD4+ T cell differentiation and function
Markus Mohrs, Trudeau Institute, Tfh cells during helminth infections: helpers without borders
Carola G. Vinuesa
, Australian National University, Unwanted Tfh cells
Sidonia Fagarasan
, RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology, T cell-independent and T cell-dependent IgA synthesis in the gut
Michael G. McHeyzer-Williams
, Scripps Research Institute, Effector and memory follicular helper T cell function in vivo
 

Sunday
May 9

 
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM

BCC Ballroom I


 

Major Symposium C Regulation of Immunity by Transcriptional and Epigenetic Networks
Chair: Kenneth M. Murphy, Washington University School of Medicine
Co-chair: Dan R. Littman, New York University School of Medicine
Mark Schlissel, University of California, Berkeley, Transcription factors and signaling pathways that regulate the V(D)J recombinase
Katia Georgopoulos
, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Ikaros and the rise and fall of the immune system
Tian Chi, Yale University, Two novel genetic approaches for studying epigenetic control in T cells
Keji Zhao
, NHLBI, NIH, Epigenetic regulation of T cell differentiation
Diane J. Mathis
, Harvard Medical School, The molecular mechanism of Aire
Kenneth M. Murphy
, Washington University School of Medicine, Immune lineage decisions regulated by atypical AP-1 factors

Sunday
May 9
  
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM

BCC Ballroom II

 

Major Symposium D New Insights into Mast Cell Function
Generously supported by Kyowa Hakko Kirin California, Inc.

Chair:
Stephen J. Galli, Stanford University
Co-chair:
Melissa A. Brown, Northwestern University

Juan Rivera, NIAMS/NIH, Sphingosine kinases and sphingosine-1-phosphate in mast cell biology and function
Toshiaki Kawakami, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, PLC-b3, a tumor suppressor, inhibits skin inflammation
Soman N. Abraham
, Duke University Medical Center, Mast cell modulation of adaptive immune responses to pathogens
Jean S. Marshall
, Dalhousie University,
Mast cell responses to viral infection and Toll-like receptor-mediated activation
Melissa A. Brown
, Northwestern University, Roles of mast cells in autoimmunity
Stephen J. Galli
, Stanford University, Mast cells as negative regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses

 
Monday
May 10
 
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM 
BCC Ballroom I

 

Major Symposium E Multi-scale Computational and Systems Approaches to Understanding Immunity
Chair: 
Ronald N. Germain, NIAID, NIH
Co-chair: 
Denise E. Kirschner, University of Michigan Medical School

Ronald N. Germain, NIAID, NIH, Introduction
Megan J. Palmer, MIT, Quantitative analysis of heterogeneity in interleukin-7 receptor/ligand dynamics, signaling, and responses in naive CD8+ T cells
Martin Meier-Schellersheim
, NIAID, NIH, Computational cell biology - from molecular interactions to cellular communication

Byron Goldstein, Los Alamos National Laboratory, From ligand-induced receptor aggregation to the aggregation of LAT: a systems biology approach to modeling FcεRI-mediated mast cell signaling
Penelope A. Morel
, University of Pittsburgh, Understanding local innate immune responses to pathogens
Denise E. Kirschner
, University of Michigan Medical School, Multi-scale and multi-systems approaches toward understanding the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection
Christophe Benoist
, Harvard Medical School, The immunological genome project

Monday
May 10
 
8:00 AM -
11:30 AM   
BCC Ballroom II


 

Major Symposium F Innate Immunoregulation at Mucosal Interfaces
Chair: Richard S. Blumberg, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School
Co-chair: Bana Jabri, University of Chicago

Thaddeus S. Stappenbeck, Washington University School of Medicine, Autophagy, Paneth cells and intestinal inflammation

Richard S. Blumberg, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, ER stress and intestinal inflammation

Andrew J. Macpherson, University of Bern, The continuum between adaptive and innate immunity in maintaining mutualism with commensal intestinal bacteria

Bana Jabri, University of Chicago, TLR6 and immune regulation

Christopher L. Karp, Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Research Foundation, Immunobiology of a gene modifying lung disease in cystic fibrosis

Averil Ma, University of California, San Francisco, Regulation of NF-κB and NOD2 pathways in mucosal tissues

 
Tuesday
May 11
  
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM
BCC Ballroom I

  
Major Symposium G Evolution of Immunocompetent Lymphocytes and Their Receptors
Chair: 
Max D. Cooper, Emory University
Co-chairMartin F. Flajnik, University of Maryland at Baltimore

Ellen Hsu, State University of New York, The basis of allelic exclusion?
Martin F. Flajnik, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Immunoglobulins and gamma/delta T cell receptors: How do we decide?
John P. Cannon, University of South Florida, Genetics, structure and function of novel immune receptors
Max D. Cooper, Emory University, Evolution of alternative adaptive immune systems
Thomas Boehm, Max-Planck-Institute of Immunobiology, Evolution of the thymus in vertebrates
Roy A. Mariuzza, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Structural insights into the evolution of adaptive immunity

Tuesday
May 11
  
 8:00 AM -
11:30 AM
BCC Ballroom II


  

Major Symposium H Negative Regulatory Networks in Health and Disease
Chair:
Arlene H. Sharpe, Harvard Medical School
Co-chair: Dario A. A. Vignali, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Arlene H. Sharpe, Harvard Medical School, Role of co-inhibitory pathways in regulating the balance between T cell activation and tolerance
David G. Brooks, UCLA, Positive and negative regulation of immunity during viral persistence
Dario A. A. Vignali, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Dissecting regulatory T cell function
Christopher A. Hunter, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Additional roles for IL-27 in immune regulation
Jane Hoyt Buckner, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Mechanisms of impaired tolerance in type 1 diabetes
Dmitry I. Gabrilovich
, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as negative regulators of immune responses
 
AWARDS
 
The AAI award programs honor members at every career stage. AAI awards are presented throughout the meeting in special sessions. For complete information on all AAI Awards, please visit www.aai.org/Awards
AAI Awards being presented at AAI's 97th Annual Meeting, IMMUNOLOGY 2010:

AAI Career Awards (subject to nomination)

· AAI Lifetime Achievement Award
· AAI Distinguished Service Award
· AAI Excellence in Mentoring Award
· AAI-Invitrogen Meritorious Career Award
· AAI-BD Biosciences Investigator Award
· AAI Award for Human Immunology Research

AAI Travel Awards and Grants (subject to application)

· Pfizer-Showell Travel Award
· AAI-Invitrogen Trainee Achievement Awards
·
AAI Junior Faculty Travel Grants
· AAI Minority Scientist Travel Awards
· Cynthia Chambers Memorial-eBioscience
     Junior Faculty Award
· AAI Trainee Abstract Awards

View 2010 AAI Travel Award and Grant Recipients

Details on awards presentations appear in the following two sections.
 
AWARD PRESENTATIONS & LECTURES

AAI-BD Biosciences Investigator Award Presentation and Lecture
Generously supported by BD Biosciences
Saturday, May 8, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Gregory M. Barton, University of California, Berkeley, Regulation and function of the Toll-like receptor family

AAI-Invitrogen Meritorious Career Award Presentation & Lecture
Generously supported by Invitrogen Corporation
Saturday, May 8, 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Dan R. Littman, HHMI, New York University School of Medicine, Microbiota and transcriptional networks in inflammatory T cell differentiation

AAI Lifetime Achievement Award
Saturday, May 8, 5:00 PM BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair
:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Susan L. Swain, Trudeau Institute
The AAI Lifetime Achievement Award is the highest honor bestowed by the AAI Council upon an AAI member. This award recognizes a deserving member for a career of scientific achievement and for contributions to AAI and fellow immunologists. The award will be presented prior to the start of Alan Shers AAI Distinguished Lecture.

AAI Award for Human Immunology Research Presentation & Lecture
Sunday, May 9, 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Raif S. Geha, Childrens Hospital Boston/ Harvard Medical School, Four decades of investigation in immunodeficiency and allergic diseases

AAI Excellence in Mentoring Award
Monday, May 10, 2:30 PM
BCC Ballroom I & II
Chair:
Betty A. Diamond, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, AAI President
Award Recipient: Jack L. Strominger, Harvard University
Hidde Ploegh, MIT, Introduction
The AAI Excellence in Mentoring Award recognizes an AAI member's exemplary career contributions to a future generation of scientists. The award will be presented prior to the start of the AAI President's Symposium.
AAI BUSINESS MEETING & AWARDS PRESENTATIONS
AAI Business Meeting & Awards Presentations
Monday, May 10, 12:45 PM - 2:15 PM
BCC Room 315
This session will include the annual report to AAI members on AAI and The Journal of Immunology business affairs and will feature special 2010 AAI awards presentations and acknowledgements. Lunch will be provided.
 
AAI Distinguished Service Award
For dedication and exemplary service to the AAI Minority Affairs Committee
Gerald Sonnenfeld
Binghamton University,
State University of New York
Randy R. Brutkiewicz
Indiana University
School of Medicine
2010 AAI Travel Award and Grant Recipients
· Pfizer-Showell Travel Award
Support for this award is generously provided through
an endowment from Henry J. Showell

Roza I. Nurieva, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

· Cynthia Chambers Memorial-eBioscience Junior Faculty Award
Support for this award has been generously provided through
an endowment from eBioscience, Inc.

Paul A. Antony, M.D.
Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Medicine

· AAI-Invitrogen Trainee Achievement Awards
Support for these awards has been generously
provided by Invitrogen Corporation

John S. Cho, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Los Angeles

Lauren W. Collison, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Selene Nuñez-Cruz, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania

Rebecca C. Obeng
Graduate Student, University of Virginia

Kari A. Shirey, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Maryland School of Medicine

R. Patrick Weitzel
Graduate Student, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine


· AAI Minority Scientist Travel Award Recipients
Support for these awards has been generously provided by
FASEB MARC (Minority Access to Research Careers)
Office of Professional Development Programs through
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
  Grant T36-GM08059-27

· AAI Junior Faculty Travel Grant Recipients
Support for these awards has been generously provided in part by
BD Biosciences and BioLegend


· AAI Trainee Abstract Award Recipients
Support for these awards has been generously provided in part by
BD Biosciences,
Genentech, Inc., and Imgenex Corporation
SOCIAL EVENTS
Opening Night Welcome Reception
Generously supported by
eBioscience, Inc.
Friday, May 7, 6:15 PM - 8:00 PM
BCC Charles Street Lobby and Mezzanine 
Dont miss the IMMUNOLOGY 2010 Opening Night Welcome Reception generously sponsored by eBioscience, Inc. Come directly from the Presidents Address into the grand foyer of the Baltimore Convention Center to enjoy drinks and hors doeuvres, catch up with colleagues, and relax from your travels. It will be our great pleasure, with the generous support of eBioscience, to welcome you to the 97th AAI Annual Meeting and wish you a productive week at IMMUNOLOGY 2010.

AAI Block Party Night at the Yard *
Generously supported by BioLegend
Sunday, May 9, 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Orioles Park at Camden Yards

Join us for this Grand Slam experience, supported by Bring your baseball caps, wear your jerseys, and come out to Eutaw Street at the entrance to Camden Yards for our Night at the Yard block party. Whether you choose just to take in the grandeur of the stadium and reminisce about baseball, or sing and dance along with the live band, this event is sure to be one for the memory books.  Terrific ballpark food including hot dogs, BBQ sandwiches, Baltimore Italian sausages, and more will be servedŠ.(and yes! peanuts and Cracker Jacks!)

*In case of rain, the party will move inside to the Camden Yards Stadium Club Level to enjoy the VIP treatment for festivities and great views of the field below.
Young Investigators Party (YIP!) 
Saturday, May 8, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM
Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, Maryland Ballroom

Attention all graduate students and postdoctoral fellows! Join other young scientists for this hip networking event. Youll enjoy a relaxed but rockin atmosphere to meet, network and dance! Party includes snacks and beverages.

Note: Special event for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows. Badges checked at door. All guests must be 21 years of age.
Service Appreciation Reception
Generously supported by BioLegend
AAI is grateful to the many members who gave precious time over the past year to make AAI tick. Their service included working on AAI committees, representing AAI in outside activities, reviewing abstracts or chairing sessions at the annual meeting, and serving as senior editors for The Journal of Immunology. A reception to say thank you is being held at the annual meeting. This reception is very generously sponsored by BioLegend.
AAI COMMITTEE-SPONSORED SESSIONS

AAI Clinical Immunology Committee

The Secret Life of Bas: The Genesis, Regulation, and Potential of Bregs
Friday, May 7, 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM BCC Room 310
Chair: Kevan Herold, Yale University

Co-chair: Cathryn Nagler, University of Chicago
Thomas F. Tedder, Duke University Medical Center, Mouse and human regulatory B10 cell development and function
Bonnie N. Dittel, BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Do B cells regulate the regulators?
Atsushi Mizoguchi, Massachusetts General Hospital, Inducible Bregs modulate intestinal inflammation
Eric Meffre,
Yale University School of Medicine, Human B cell tolerance checkpoints in health and disease
Although regulatory T cells have received much of the press in immune regulation, recent data have demonstrated that regulatory B cells also exist and are important for proper control of immunity. Come to this session to learn the latest progress in understanding the regulation of B cells, how they in turn regulate immune responses, and their potential clinical roles in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.
 
 
Unraveling Chronic Inflammatory Lung Disease: Mucosal Immunity Gone Bad?
Monday, May 10, 12:30 PM
- 2:30 PM BCC Room 310
Chair:
Jay K. Kolls, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Co-chair: Kathleen E. Sullivan, Childrens Hospital Philadelphia
Jack A. Elias, Yale University School of Medicine, Chitinases and chitinase-like proteins in lung injury and inflammation
Andrew P. Fontenot, University of Colorado Denver, Th17 cells and hypersensitivity pneumonitis
Anuradha Ray, University of Pittsburgh, The hygiene hypothesis revisited: innate regulation of effector arm in allergic asthma
Robert Palermo, University of Washington, Seattle, Functional genomics investigations of H1N1 influenza pathogenesis
The lung is a site constantly at risk for the development of inflammatory diseases ranging from allergic asthma to infectious disease such as H1N1-mediated swine flu. This session will address the wide range of potential clinical disturbances of lung immune homeostasis and ways order can be restored to this vital organ.

AAI Committee on Public Affairs

Big Funding + Big Opportunities = Big Science? NIH Priorities in the Post-Stimulus Era
Saturday, May 8, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
BCC Room 316-317
Chair: John R. Schreiber, Tufts University School of Medicine; Chair, AAI Committee on Public Affairs
Anthony S. Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Richard J. Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging
Stephen I. Katz, Director, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
John E. Niederhuber, Director, National Cancer Institute
With $10 billion in stimulus funding, a new Director, and the possibility of the largest budget in its history, NIH has an unprecedented opportunity to shape the future of the biomedical research enterprise. How this plays out will affect every researcher, every lab, and every student who aspires to a research career. Will it be Big Science? Fewer RO1s? More clinical, translational, or comparative effectiveness research?  This session is your chance to hear directly from four key NIH Institute Directors, all of whom are directly involved in the planning and implementation of NIH and Institute priorities. A question and answer period will follow the presentations.

Dr. Fauci

Dr. Hodes

Dr. Katz

Dr. Niederhuber
 
 
Protecting Animal Research in the Face of Legislation, Extremists, and Public Ambivalence
Sunday, May 9, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
BCC Room 324-326
Chair: John R. Schreiber, Tufts University School of Medicine; Chair, AAI Committee on Public Affairs
Frankie Trull, President, National Association for Biomedical Research and Foundation for Biomedical Research
Drew Ptasienski, Unit Chief, Domestic Terrorism Operations Unit, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Scientists who use animals in their research are faced with myriad challenges, ranging from the mundane (administrative burden) to the menacing (animal rights extremists). This session will explore legislative and legal challenges to the use of animals in research and provide invaluable advice about how researchers can protect themselves and their labs from animal rights extremists.

 
 

Meet the Advocacy Partners

Monday, May 10, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM BCC Room 328

Chair: John R. Schreiber, Tufts University School of Medicine; Chair, AAI Committee on Public Affairs

Representatives from the following groups will be available to talk about their work and about scientific and funding opportunities that may be available to AAI members/meeting attendees:

Aeras Global TB Vaccine Foundation
American Association for Cancer Research
Arthritis Foundation
Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

Immune Deficiency Foundation
Infectious Diseases Society of America
Lupus Foundation of America, Inc.

AAI Education Committee

AAI High School Teachers Summer Research Program Workshop: Lessons in Immunology
Saturday, May 8, 9:00 AM - 12:00 Noon BCC Room 315
Chair: Brian A. Cobb, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
The AAI High School Teachers Summer Research Program brings the excitement of immunology directly to high school students through curricula developed by participating science teachers. This program pairs high school science teachers with established AAI member immunologists who mentor them in their laboratories in a hands-on summer internship. The teachers develop a science project for the classroom based on their summer research experience. In this session, the 2009-2010 participating high school teachers will present their experiences and projects.
 
 
The Balancing Act: Teaching and Research at Undergraduate Institutions
Sunday, May 9, 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM BCC Room 321-323
Chair: Sharon A. Stranford, Mount Holyoke College
Co-chair: Jennifer A. Punt, Haverford College
A panel of outstanding immunologists who teach and conduct research at premier undergraduate colleges will share their experience and advice in doing both.

Sharon A. Stranford, Mount Holyoke College, Money and time: funding your research and balancing your job
Richard A. Goldsby, Amherst College, Preparing for and finding a job
Jennifer A. Punt, Haverford College, Innovative models for laboratory teaching
Devavani Chatterjea, Macalester College, Engaging with the material: teaching reading, writing and questioning skills

AAI Education Committee &
AAI Committee on the Status of Women


Dr. Nacy

Careers in Science: Lecture and Roundtable
Sunday, May 9, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM BCC Ballroom III
Chair: Bonnie N. Dittel, BloodCenter of Wisconsin; Chair, AAI CSOW
Keynote Speaker: Carol A. Nacy
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Sequella, Inc.
Traversing the scientific and cultural borders of academia and industry
In todays economic environment, many scientists are wondering about employment prospects inside and out of the research lab. Perhaps you are even wondering what transferable skills youve developed as a scientist and what careers they may enable you to pursue? Attend this session to learn about career options and successful paths to each. The keynote speaker is scientist and entrepreneur Carol Nacy. She will share lessons learned along the path of her research career in government and industry. Following her presentation, roundtable discussions led by experienced scientists will focus on specific career issues and options important to men and women in science today.

Round Table Discussion Topics:

Academic Research Careers

Table Leaders:  Gail A. Bishop, Ph.D., University of Iowa and Arthur Weiss, M.D., Ph.D., HHMI, UCSF

Building Effective Mentoring Programs and Networks

Table Leader:  Janis K. Burkhardt, Ph.D., Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia

Career and Family: time management/family leave/professional couples

Table Leader:  Patricia Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Ph.D., UMDNJ

Careers in Biotech and Industry: moving from academia to industry and vice versa; differences and similarities in work environment

Table Leaders:  John G. Monroe, Ph.D., Genentech and Monica Mann, Ph.D., EMD Serono

Careers at Governmental Agencies (FDA/NIH)

Table Leader:  Daniela I. Verthelyi, Ph.D., FDA, and Alan Sher, Ph.D., NIAID, NIH

Career Decisions after Tenure

Table Leader:  Gerald Sonnenfeld, Ph.D., Binghamton University, SUNY

Graduate Student to Postdoc: finding a postdoc, interviewing

Table Leaders:  Andy Kokaji, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow, STEMCELL Technologies and Mitchell Kronenberg, Ph.D., President and CSO, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

New PI: attracting students and postdocs, preparing for tenure

Table Leader:  Patricia Cortes, Ph.D., Mt. Sinai School of Medicine

Non-Research Careers: patent law, science writing, scientists engaged in public affairs, careers in scientific non-profits; unique careers that utilize your training

Table Leaders:  M. Michele Hogan, Ph.D., The American Association of Immunologists, Lauren G. Gross, J.D., The American Association of Immunologists, and Susan Wolski, J.D., U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Postdoc to PI: finding a position, interviewing, negotiating, lab start-up

Table Leaders:  Jill E. Slansky, Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver and Thais Salazar-Mather, Ph.D., Brown University

Translational Research: how to balance clinical duties and research

Table Leader:  Terri M. Laufer, M.D., University of Pennsylvania

Undergraduate Institutions: teaching, doing research

Table Leader:  Sharon A. Stranford, Ph.D., Mt. Holyoke College
Registration required: $15 includes dessert buffet and coffee.

AAI Minority Affairs Committee

Careers and Networking Roundtable
Saturday, May 8, 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM BCC Room 327
Chair: Prosper N. Boyaka, The Ohio State University; Chair, AAI Minority Affairs Committee
Don't miss this opportunity to meet one-on-one with accomplished, senior minority immunologists to hear how they have handled the career challenges you now face. Learn what they believe will work for you today. Topics to be discussed:
Grad Student: Finding a mentor; taking aim at postdoc training
Postdoc: Finding a mentor; taking aim at a faculty position
Junior Faculty: Preparing for promotion and tenure
Academia or Industry: How to decide (or switch sides)
Government Agency Careers: CDC, FDA, NIH
Alternative Careers: Science journalism, patent law
Registration, $15 fee required; box lunch included.
 
 
Minority Affairs Committee Guest Lecture
Generously supported through a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH [FASEB MARC Program: T36-GM08059-27]
Monday, May 10, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM BCC Room 309
Chair: Prosper N. Boyaka, The Ohio State University; Chair, AAI Minority Affairs Committee


Albert Zlotnik, University of California, Irvine
An evolutionary view of chemokines

AAI Publications Committee

Successfully Navigating Manuscript Preparation and Peer Review
Generously supported by Immunology Science Editors

Sunday, May 9, 12:45 PM - 2:45 PM BCC Room 315
Chair: Robert D. Schreiber, Washington University School of Medicine; Chair, AAI Publications Committee

Your data may be good and your findings may be significant, but your manuscript will navigate peer review only as well as you present your findings. Learn from presentations made by expert scientists and editors about good practices in data presentation and manuscript preparation. Learn, too, how to understand what reviewers are (and arent) saying and how to respond to their comments. Ample time will be allowed for questions and answers at the end of the session

Paul E. Love, NICHD, NIH, A picture paints a thousand words preparing manuscript figures
Cathryn Nagler, The University of Chicago, Telling the rest of the story preparing manuscript text
Michael S. Krangel, Duke University, Transcending that fight or flight reflex understanding and responding to reviewer comments
Jeremy M. Boss, Emory University School of Medicine, Whats wrong here? ethical considerations in manuscript preparation

AAI Veterinary Immunology Committee
jointly sponsored with the
American Association of Veterinary Immunologists (AAVI)
Immunology of Emerging Infectious Diseases
Monday, May 10, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM BCC Room 324-326
Chair: Simon M. Barratt-Boyes, University of Pittsburgh
Co-chair: Douglas D. Bannerman, Department of Veterans Affairs

Michael S. Diamond, Washington University, Novel mechanisms of innate immune control and evasion of West Nile Virus
Linda J. Saif, Ohio State University, Respiratory viral co-infections and corticosteroids alter immune responses and enhance pneumonia in a porcine respiratory coronavirus model in pigs: lessons for SARS
Christopher M. Walker, The Research Institute at Nationwide Childrens Hospital, Cellular immunity to the hepatitis C virus: can a failed response be rescued?
Adolfo GarcĂ­a-Sastre, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Evasion of immunity by new H1N1 pandemic influenza viruses

Research in non-human, non-mouse species can provide important insights into human immunity. This is especially important when a pathogen evolves the ability to move between species and establishes disease in humans. In this session, veterinary immunologists will present the latest research into such zoonotic diseases as West Nile Virus and swine flu.
NIH INSTITUTE-SPONSORED SYMPOSIA

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)

Tumors and Inflammatory Cells: Coconspirators or Adversaries
Monday, May 10, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM
BCC Room 308
Chair:
 James J. Lee, Mayo Clinic Arizona

Co-chair:
Susan A. McCarthy, NCI, NIH

Mary M. Zutter, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, a2b1 integrins in squamous cell carcinoma: inflammation and lymphangiogenesis

Michael T. Lotze, University of Pittsburgh, Metabolism, inflammation, and cancer: role(s) of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules

Hans Schreiber, University of Chicago, Inflammation and stroma as tumor promoters in cancer induction

Klaus Ley, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation

James J. Lee, Mayo Clinic Arizona, The role(s) of eosinophils in cancer: pro-tumorigenic, anti-tumorigenic, or simply innocent bystanders?

National Institute of Allergy and

Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Immunology of Malaria in the 21st Century:  Questions and Solutions
Monday, May 10, 12:30 PM
- 2:30 PM BCC Room 324-326
Chairs:
Alison Deckhut Augustine, DAIT, NIAID, NIH; Lee F. Hall, DMID, NIAID, NIH 

James W. Kazura, Case Western Reserve University, Exposure and age-related heterogeneity of naturally acquired immunity to human Plasmodium falciparum infection
Myriam Arévalo-Herrera
, Instituto de InmunologĂ­a de la Universidad del Valle, Plasmodium vivax malaria:  studies on transmission-blocking immunity in search for vaccine for human use
Eleanor M. Riley
, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Long-lived antibody and B cell memory responses to the human malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax
Douglas T. Golenbock
, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Recognition of DNA by the innate immune system causes inflammation during malaria

 Harnessing B Cells to Combat HIV
Monday, May 10, 2:45 PM
- 4:45 PM BCC Room 309
Chairs:
Stacy Ferguson, DAIT, NIAID, NIH; Alan Embry, DAIDS, NIAID, NIH
Moderator: Georgia D. Tomaras, Duke University Medical Center

James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Molecular diversity in HIV-specific human B cell repertoires
Andrea Cerutti
, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, HIV infection and immunoglobulin class switching
Robert T. Woodland
, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Humanized mice as a research tool for HIV vaccine development
Garnett Kelsoe
, Duke University Medical Center, Increasing immunogenicity of HIV MPER antigens by breaking tolerance

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal
 and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
 Innate Immunity:  Biology and Implications in Disease
Saturday, May 8, 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM BCC Room 307
Chair: 
Robert H. Carter, NIAMS, NIH
Co-chair:
 Marie Mancini, NIAMS, NIH

Ann Marshak-Rothstein, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Tolling down the road to SLE
Donald Y. M. Leung
, National Jewish Health, Role of barrier in the skins innate immune response
Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti
, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, NLR inflammasomes in innate immunity, inflammation, and host defense
Daniel L. Kastner
, NIAMS, NIH, Horror autoinflammaticus: the expanding spectrum of systemic autoinflammatory disease

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

T Cell Dysfunction with Aging
Monday, May 10, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM
BCC Room 307
Chair:
Rebecca A. Fuldner, NIA, NIH

Co-chair: Nan-ping Weng, NIA, NIH

Susan L. Swain, Trudeau Institute, With age, increased naĂŻve CD4 T cell lifespan, caused by reduced expression of Bim, is necessary for development of functional defects
Nan-ping Weng, NIA, NIH, Probing the in vivo changes of human immune system with age: a 5-year study of the old participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging (BLSA)
Jörg J. Goronzy, Stanford University, T cell signaling in aging - in favor of phosphatase activity
Claire A. Chougnet, Cincinnati Childrens Hospital, Accumulation of regulatory T cells and age-related immunosuppression

GUEST SOCIETY SYMPOSIA
American Association of Veterinary Immunologists (AAVI) and AAI Veterinary Immunology Committee Joint Symposium Immunology of Emerging Infectious Diseases
Monday, May 10, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM BCC Room 324-326
Chair:
Simon M. Barratt-Boyes, University of Pittsburgh
Co-chair: 
Douglas D. Bannerman, Department of Veterans Affairs
Michael S. Diamond, Washington University, Novel mechanisms of innate immune control and evasion of West Nile Virus
Linda J. Saif, Ohio State University, Respiratory viral co-infections and corticosteroids alter immune responses and enhance pneumonia in a porcine respiratory coronavirus model in pigs: lessons for SARS
Christopher M. Walker, The Research Institute at Nationwide Childrens Hospital, Cellular immunity to the hepatitis C virus: can a failed response be rescued?
Adolfo GarcĂ­a-Sastre, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Evasion of immunity by new H1N1 pandemic influenza viruses
American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Symposium Factors Affecting the Nature of the Alloresponse in Graft-versus-Host Disease
Sunday, May 9, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 324-326
Chair: William J. Murphy, University of California, Davis
Co-chair: Pavan R. Reddy, University of Michigan
Pavan R. Reddy, University of Michigan, Induction of GVHD
Warren D. Shlomchik, Yale University School of Medicine, Antigen presentation in graft-vs-host disease
William J. Murphy, University of California, Davis, Diverse role of cytokines in GVHD
Thea M. Friedman, Hackensack University Medical Center, Vbeta spectratype analysis-guided selection of GVHD-reactive T cells in allogenic BMT
American Society of Hematology (ASH) Symposium Stem Cell Biology, the Niche and Hematopoietic Cell Engraftment
Monday, May 10, 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM BCC Room 316-317
Chair:
 Hal E. Broxmeyer, Indiana University School of Medicine
Co-chair:
David T. Scadden, Harvard Stem Cell Institute
Irving L. Weissman, Stanford University, Stem cell biology and characterization
Hiromitsu Nakauchi, University of Tokyo, Hematopoietic stem cell signature
David T. Scadden, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Hematopoietic stem cell niche
George Q. Daley, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, iPS cells and reprogramming
Hal E. Broxmeyer, Indiana University School of Medicine, Enhancing engraftment/recovery of hematopoietic stem cells
American Society of Transplantation (AST) Symposium Impact of T and B Lymphocyte Memory in Transplantation
Saturday, May 8, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
BCC Room 308
Chair:
  Ronald G. Gill, Alberta Diabetes Institute
Co-chair:
  Robert L. Fairchild, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Marc K. Jenkins, University of Minnesota, Monitoring immune responses in vivo
Anita S.F. Chong
, University of Chicago, Memory B cells as barriers to transplant outcomes
Mandy L. Ford
, Emory University, Memory T cells as barriers to transplant outcomes
Xian C. Li
, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Targeting memory T cells in transplantation

Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists (AMLI) Symposium Progress towards Induction of Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Autoimmune Disease
Sunday, May 9, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM
BCC Room 307
Chair: 
John Schmitz, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Co-chair: 
Barbara Detrick, Johns Hopkins University

Stephen D. Miller, Northwestern University, An antigen-specific tolerance approach for the therapy of autoimmune disease and tissue transplantation
Roland M. Tisch
, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, The use of soluble MHC-peptide dimers to suppress beta cell autoimmunity
David S. Bradley
, University of North Dakota, An alternative therapy for autoimmune diseases:  the potential of an immature dendritic cell vaccine for spontaneous polyarthritis
Robert B. Nussenblatt
, NEI, NIH, Oral tolerance and ocular inflammatory disease

Australasian Society for Immunology (ASI) Symposium Dendritic Cell Specializations from Bench to Bedside
Sunday, May 9, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM BCC Room 307
Chair: 
Derek N. J. Hart, University of Sydney

Andrew M. Lew, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Iatrogenic depletion of cross-presenters and a new role for CD40L on DC
Kristen J. Radford, Mater Medical Research Institute, Human blood DC subsets and function
Bruce W. S. Robinson
, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, DC subsets and cross presentation in cancer
Jose A. Villadangos
, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Antigen presentation specializations in the DC network
Li Wu
, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Transcription factor PU.1 controls DC development through the dose-dependent regulation of Flt3

British Society for Immunology (BSI) Symposium Immunosurveillance
Sunday, May 9, 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM BCC Room 307
Chair: Tracy Hussell, Imperial College London
Co-chair:
Arne N. Akbar, University College London

Tracy Hussell, Imperial College London, Regulation of immune surveillance in the lung
Eyal Raz, University of California, San Diego, Th17: canonical and non-canonical differentiation pathways
Arne N. Akbar
, University College London, Decreased cutaneous immunosurveillance after antigenic challenge during aging
Andrew L. Mellor
, Medical College of Georgia Immunotherapy Center, Enhancing immunosurveillance in chronic inflammatory diseases by manipulating IDO

Canadian Society for Immunology (CSI) Symposium Genetic Susceptibility to Immunodeficiencies and Autoimmunity
Monday, May 10, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 310
Chair
:  AndrĂ© Veillette, Clinical Research Institute of Montreal
André Veillette, Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Immune regulation by SAP, a molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease
Jennifer L. Cannons, NHGRI, NIH, Lymphocyte adhesion:  lessons from X-linked lymphoproliferative disease
Philippe Poussier, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Research Institute, University of Toronto, Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes in the BB rat
Jayne S. Danska, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Unraveling complex disease:  genetic and immunological analysis of type 1 diabetes
Pere Santamaria, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, University of Calgary, IL-2 and regulatory T cells in autoimmunity
Chinese Society of Immunology (ChSI) Symposium Linking Innate and Adaptive Immunity
Sunday, May 9, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 314
Chair:
  Xuetao Cao, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai
Co-chair:
Olivera (Olja) J. Finn, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Limin Zheng, Sun Yat-Sen University, Activated monocytes in peritumor stroma promote disease progression by fostering immune privilege and Th17 cell expansion
Zhihai Qin, Center for Infection and Immunity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, IFN-γ controls Th17-mediated immunopathology during mouse hepatitis virus infection
Yu Zhang, Peking University Health Science Center, Thymic microenvironment and T lymphopoiesis
Changyou Wu, Sun Yat-Sen University, Human memory IL-22-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Candida albicans
Xuetao Cao, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, Regulation of memory T cell generation by innate cells
International Society of Developmental and Comparative Immunology (ISDCI) Symposium Novel Strategies of Non-Self Recognition by Invertebrate and Non-Mammalian Vertebrate Model Species
Monday, May 10, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
BCC Room 318-320
Chair:
J. Oriol Sunyer, University of Pennsylvania

Jacques Robert, University of Rochester Medical Center, Comparative and evolutionary study of tumor immunity in the non-mammalian xenopus model
Eva Bengtén
, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Insights into teleost IgD function
J. Oriol Sunyer
, University of Pennsylvania, Convergent evolution of mucosal immunoglobulins of fish and mammals
Brantley R. Herrin
, Emory University, Antigen recognition by lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors
L. Courtney Smith,
George Washington University, Highly variable immune- response proteins (185/333) from the sea urchin

International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research (ISICR) Symposium Immunobiology of IL-10 Family Members
Monday, May 10, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM
BCC Room 308
Chair:
 Grant Gallagher, HUMIGEN, the Institute for Genetic Immunology
Co-chair: 
Reen Wu, University of California, Davis

Reen Wu, University of California, Davis, Regulation of airway mucosal immunity by IL-19
Kerstin Wolk
, University Hospital Charite, IL-20 and IL-22:  biology and role in disease
Elizabeth A. Grimm
, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, IL-24, an IL-10 family cytokine with immunostimulatory and tumor suppressor functions
Grant Gallagher
, HUMIGEN, the Institute for Genetic Immunology, Regulation of interferon lambda-1 (IL-29) in airway epithelium

International Society of Neuroimmunology (ISNI) Symposium RNA Regulation in Neuroimmunology
Sunday, May 9, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM BCC Room 308
Chair:
Caroline C. Whitacre, Ohio State University
Alexander Y. Rudensky, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, MicroRNAs in regulatory T cell homeostasis and function
Brigit Alette de Jong, Stanford University, MicroRNA-based network and pathway analysis in multiple sclerosis lesions and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Kristen Smith, Ohio State University, MicroRNAs: modulators of T cell effector function in EAE and MS
Amy E. Lovett-Racke, Ohio State University, Identifying microRNA differentially expressed in T cells of MS patients
Japanese Society for Immunology (JSI) Symposium Positive and Negative Regulation in the Immune Response
Saturday, May 8, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 308
Chair:
Alan Sher, NIAID, NIH
Co-chair: Shizuo Akira, Osaka University
Shizuo Akira, Osaka University, Negative regulators in innate immune responses
Toshio Hirano, Osaka University, Regulation of immune response by cytokine and zinc signaling
Hajime Karasuyama, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Novel roles for basophils in immune and allergic responses
Shimon Sakaguchi, Kyoto University, T cell signaling, regulatory T cells, and self-tolerance
Singaporean Society for Immunology (SSI) Symposium: Immune Recognition and Cellular Communication
Saturday, May 8, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 314
Chair: S. K. Alex Law, Nanyang Technological University
S. K. Alex Law, Nanyang Technological University, Lessons from leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD)-1
Stephan Gasser, National University of Singapore, DNA damage response: a novel innate immune recognition system?
Paul A. MacAry, National University of Singapore, The generation, characterization, and application of a TCR-like monoclonal antibody
Christiane Ruedl, Nanyang Technological University, GM-CSF is the major CD8+ T cell-derived licensing factor for dendritic cell maturation and survival
Sociedad Mexicana de InmunologĂ­a (SMI) Symposium From Mice to Men: Immunology Research in Mexico
Tuesday, May 11, 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM BCC Room 314
Chairs:
  Leopoldo Santos-Argumedo, CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City; Fernando Esquivel-Guadarrama, Universidad AutĂłnoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca
Leopoldo Santos-Argumedo, CINVESTAV-IPN, Primary human immunodeficiencies
Fernando Esquivel-Guadarrama, Universidad AutĂłnoma del Estado de Morelos, Analysis of the response of intestinal dendritic cells in rotavirus infection in a mouse model
Iris Estrada, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias BiolĂłgicas-IPN, Neutrophil extracellular traps induced by Mycobacteria tuberculosis
Rosana Pelayo, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Early precursor cells in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Society for Leukocyte Biology (SLB) Symposium Immunobiology of Innate Immune Signaling
Saturday, May 8, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM BCC Room 309
Chair: 
Christopher L. Karp, Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center
Co-chair: 
Sanna Goyert, City University of New York

Bruce Beutler, Scripps Research Institute, Genetic approaches to innate immunity
Julie Magarian Blander, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, PRRs and antigen presentation
Peter J. Murray, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, Signaling to arginine metabolism in intracellular pathogenesis
Katherine A. Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Immunobiology of DNA sensing pathways

Society for Natural Immunity (SNI) Symposium The Many Sides of the Natural Killer Cell Response
Saturday, May 8, 2:45 PM - 4:45 PM BCC Room 307
Chairs:
John E. Coligan, NIAID, NIH; David H. Margulies, NIAID, NIH
David H. Raulet, University of California, Berkeley, Activating and inhibitory receptors in the tuning of NK cell responsiveness
Daniel M. Davis, Imperial College, London, Nanotubes and synapses in NK cell recognition
David H. Margulies, NIAID, NIH, Viral immunoevasion of the NK cell response: a structural perspective
Katharine Hsu, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, The role of KIR genes and NK cell recognition in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
CAREER DEVELOPMENT SESSIONS
Crafting a Successful Grant
Generously supported in part through a grant from BD Biosciences
Friday, May 7, 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM BCC Room 314
Instructor: Donna Vogel, Director, Professional Development Office, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Funded investigators are made - not born. Knowing how to construct an outstanding application and good writing skills are necessary to compete successfully for grants. There is, however, more to a winning application than good writing; strategy is critical! Optimize both your content and strategy by attending this half-day course taught by Donna Vogel, Director, Professional Development Office at Johns Hopkins. The course will focus on how to write and structure a grant for clarity and reviewer comprehension. The NIH grant review process including recent changes will also be discussed.

The instructor will cover:
Title, Specific Aims, and Abstract
Research Strategy (significance... innovation... approach... preliminary studies)
Peer Review and Re-submission
All who are interested in applying for research fundinginvestigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate studentswill benefit from this session. The $110 registration will include a boxed lunch and refreshment breaks.
AAI High School Teachers Summer Research Program Workshop: Lessons in Immunology
Saturday, May 8, 9:00 AM - 12:00 Noon BCC Room 315
Chair: Brian A. Cobb, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Sponsored by the AAI Education Committee -- Session Details
Careers and Networking Roundtable
Saturday, May 8, 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM BCC Room 327
Chair: Prosper N. Boyaka, The Ohio State University; Chair, AAI Minority Affairs Committee
Sponsored by the AAI Minority Affairs Committee -- Session Details
Interviewing for a Job
Sunday, May 9, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
BCC Room 315
Chair: Kira Gantt, The American Association of Immunologists
Speaker: Lori Conlan, Director of NIH Office of Postdoctoral Services
This session will be focused on tips and techniques to help you successfully navigate the interview process. Emphasis will be on how you can present yourself in the best possible light. You will also learn how to respond to unexpected questions. This session is intended for all student and postdoctoral attendees.
Secrets for a Successful Postdoctoral Fellowship
Sunday, May 9, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
BCC Room 315
Chair: Kira Gantt, The American Association of Immunologists
Speaker: Lori Conlan, Director of NIH Office of Postdoctoral Services
A postdoctoral fellowship is the time to develop research skills you will need to succeed as an independent scientist. It is, however, just as important to realize that you need to prepare for a career path at the same time. This session will highlight ways of getting the most out of your postdoctoral fellowship, relating successfully with your mentor, and understanding how to use the resources available to you to ensure that your training prepares you adequately for a seamless transition into the next phase of your career.
The Balancing Act: Teaching and Research at Undergraduate Institutions
Sunday, May 9, 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM BCC Room 321-323
Chair: Sharon A. Stranford, Mount Holyoke College
Co-chair: Jennifer A. Punt, Haverford College
Sponsored by the AAI Education Committee -- Session Details
Successfully Navigating Manuscript Preparation and Peer Review
Generously supported by Immunology Science Editors

Sunday, May 9, 12:45 PM - 2:45 PM BCC Room 315
Chair: Robert D. Schreiber, Washington University School of Medicine; Chair, AAI Publications Committee
Sponsored by the AAI Publications Committee -- Session Details
Careers in Science: Lecture and Roundtable
Sunday, May 9, 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM BCC Ballroom III
Chair: Bonnie N. Dittel, BloodCenter of Wisconsin; Chair, AAI CSOW
Sponsored by the AAI Education Committee and the AAI Committee on the Status of Women -- Session Details
How to Convert Your CV into a Resumé
Monday May 10, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
BCC Room 314
Chair: Kira Gantt, The American Association of Immunologists
Instructor: Derek Haseltine, Director, Research Career Development at University of Maryland School of Medicine
For anyone seeking a job outside of academe, how you present yourself on paper is critical. A well prepared resumé can make all the difference in whether you secure that interview. The focus of this session will be on the important elements of a resumé, the differences between a resumé and the standard academic curriculum vitae, and the information needed for a good impression. In this special career development session, attendees will be instructed in how to take their CVs and transform them into professional resumes. Small breakout sessions for individual consulting will follow from 12:30 PM 2:30 PM. Bring your CV!
EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY, MAY 8

Monetizing Your Intellectual Property: Protecting Ideas That Generate Income

Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear LLP

10:00 AM 11:00 AM, Room 311

Presenters: Mark Benedict, Ph.D., Partner, Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear LLP; Michael L. Fuller, Partner, Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear LLP

 

We will explore what types of research innovations are protectable and discuss practical tips for protecting these innovations while avoiding some common pitfalls that could compromise your intellectual property. We will also develop strategies for leveraging your intellectual property to generate entrepreneurial opportunities, personal revenue, and support for your ongoing research.

Moving Beyond PhenotypingNovel Molecular Probes Reagents to Analyze Cellular Functions

Invitrogen Corporation

10:00 AM 11:00 AM, Room 312

Presenter: Jeffrey Croissant, Ph.D., Senior Marketing Manager, Flow Cytometry Systems, Molecular Probes - Invitrogen Labeling and Detection Technologies, Eugene, Oregon

 

Invitrogen recently introduced a number of novel reagents and assays developed using Molecular Probes fluorescence detection technologies that enable researchers and clinicians to analyze cell function far beyond subset identification. This tutorial will present a number of cutting edge fluorescent reagents for flow cytometry, imaging, and high content screening, with practical examples and details. A diverse number of applications will be presented including: Cell Proliferation, Cell Cycle, Viability, Apoptosis, and Organelle Labeling for live cell imaging. The cell proliferation and cell cycle products to be highlighted include: CellTrace Violet Cell Proliferation Kit as a CFSE alternative for use with violet laser excitation, the use of Click-iT EdU technology and highly specific antibodies for BrdU to enable a simplified method of dual pulse labeling for imaging and flow cytometry, Premo FUCCI Cell Cycle Sensor using live cell imaging to view fluorescent changes as a cell progresses through the cell cycle and division, and Vybrant DyeCycle Ruby Stain for far red excitation live cell cycle analysis without cytotoxicity. Viability reagents include the amine-reactive dye LIVE/DEAD Fixable Yellow and the impermeant nucleic acid dye SYTOX AADvanced stain. Apoptosis products will introduce the F2N12S Membrane Asymmetry probe for adherent and suspension cells detected with violet laser excitation. For imaging and HCS applications an introduction to Organelle Lights Reagents using BacMam Delivery Technology will be given. These reagents can easily be combined with phenotypic markers to develop higher color panels allowing more information to be collected from every experiment.

Multicolor Flow Cytometry: Tips for Panel Design and Analysis of Intracellular Targets

eBioscience, Inc.

11:00 AM 12:00 PM, Room 312

Presenter: Traci Zell, Ph.D., Scientific Applications Manager, eBioscience, Inc.

 

Flow cytometry is increasingly recognized as an indispensable technique for deciphering complex cellular processes and interactions in a variety of systems that model normal and disease states. Recent advances in both instrument technologies and new fluorochromes have made it possible to characterize both the phenotype and function of individual cells within complex populations. Topics to be covered include: instrument performance and impact on multicolor panels, tips for panel design, and appropriate controls to validate panels.

A New, Flexible Alternative to Traditional Research Methods

Accuriź Cytometers, Inc.

12:00 PM 1:00 PM, Room 311

Presenter: Maria Dinkelmann, Ph.D., Laboratory Manager, Accuriź Cytometers, Inc.

 

This workshop will highlight the versatility of the Accuri C6 Flow Cytometer System by focusing on data analysis of research experiments including: single platform cell counting with viability, proliferation and cell cycle analyses, population and phenotypic characterization and multiplex bead analysis. With its minimal set-up requirements and simple-to-learn user interface, the affordable C6 is an attractive alternative to many traditional research methods. Refreshments provided.

Microplate-based Antibody Arrays: A New High Performance Multiplex Technology

R&D Systems, Inc.

12:00 PM 1:00 PM, Room 312

Presenter: Kathy Brumbaugh, Ph.D., Manager, Intracellular Department, R&D Systems, Inc.

 

R&D Systems Mosaic ELISA and Proteome Profiler 96 Antibody Arrays utilize the traditional sandwich ELISA format to measure multiple secreted or signal transduction-related factors in a single microplate well. The assays require small sample sizes and utilize common laboratory camera systems for data acquisition. Learn how these arrays combine sensitivity, reproducibility, and throughput not found in other multiplex formats.

Simultaneous Correlation of Cytokine Production with Treg and Th17 Cell Proliferation

BD Biosciences

1:00 PM 2:00 PM, Room 311

Presenter: Jurg Rohrer, Ph.D., R&D Director/Research Immunology, BD Biosciences

 

Functionally polarized CD4+ T cell subsets can be identified based on their distinctive patterns of cytokine secretion and transcription factor expression. As a signature cytokine, Th17 cells express high levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) whereas T regulatory cells (Treg) are characterized by the expression of the FoxP3 transcription factor. In the mouse, TGFβis required for the production of IL-17A, although additional

cytokines are also produced by Th17 cells, including Th1-like cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γand Th2-like cytokines (IL-4, IL-10). Using an in vitro polarization system we aimed to correlate cell cycle progression with cytokine production, FoxP3 expression, and cytokine-induced phosphorylation. Cell cycle progression was monitored using a cell proliferation dye, cytokine production was monitored by intracellular staining as well as by cytometric bead array (CBA), Treg were detected by FoxP3 staining, and phospho-proteins were detected using Phosflow technology. Multiple fixation and permeabilization conditions were required for resolution of the intracellular cytokines, FoxP3, and phospho-proteins. We were able to show that under the specific culture conditions, IL-17A appeared after two days and was restricted to newer generations of cells. During the earlier culture time points, IL-2 and IL-17A were coexpressed, but after several days in culture the expression became mutually exclusive. Analysis of Stat5 phosphorylation revealed heterogeneous responses to secreted cytokines, with newer generations of cells showing the most robust phosphorylation responses. These data demonstrate the wealth of information that can be obtained from such experiments when using multiple analysis tools. The experiments also underscore the importance of optimizing the protocols for using the reagents to obtain the widest possible data matrixes.

SUNDAY, MAY 9

Measuring Immune Function with Imaging Flow Cytometry

Amnis Corporation

10:00 AM 11:00 AM, Room 311

Presenters: Patricia Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Ph.D., UMDNJ; Jing Wang, Ph.D., Univ. Rochester; Michael Russell, Ph.D., Univ. Buffalo; Lynn Hassman, Univ. Virginia; Adrian Wiestner, Ph.D., NHLBI

 

Measurement of mechanisms of immune function with the ImageStream imaging flow cytometry will be explored through the experiences of several prominent speakers. A diverse range of topics will be covered, including immune response to viral infection, phagocytosis of fungal pathogens, trafficking of antigens, and effector mechanisms of therapeutic antibody-induced tumor clearance.

Acoustic Focusing Flow CytometryA New Breakthrough in Cell-by-Cell Analysis

Invitrogen Corporation

10:00 AM 11:00 AM, Room 312

Presenter: Jeffrey Croissant, Ph.D., Senior Marketing Manager, Molecular Probes - Invitrogen Labeling and Detection Technologies, Eugene, Oregon

 

Acoustic cytometry is a new technology that replaces or partly replaces hydrodynamic focusing of cells or particles in flow cytometry with forces derived from acoustic radiation pressure. The ability to focus cells into a tight line without relying on hydrodynamic forces allows many possibilities outside the scope of conventional flow cytometry. Dilute samples can be processed quickly. Flow rates can be varied, allowing control of particle delivery parameters such as interrogation time and volumetric sample input rates. Recently, Life Technologies unveiled the Applied Biosystems Attune Acoustic Focusing Cytometer that implements this new form of particle delivery into a benchtop analyzer. In this talk, the application of acoustic cytometry from fundamental principles to specific details of its implementation in cell analysis systems will be presented. This will be followed by an introduction of the Attune Acoustic Focusing Cytometer, a new benchtop cytometer that delivers greater sensitivity, higher sample acquisition rates, and greater control than conventional flow cytometers.

Measuring Immune Function with Imaging Flow Cytometry

Amnis Corporation

11:00 AM 12:00 PM, Room 311

Presenters: Patricia Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Ph.D., UMDNJ; Jing Wang, Ph.D., Univ. Rochester; Michael Russell, Ph.D., Univ. Buffalo; Lynn Hassman, Univ. Virginia; Adrian Wiestner, Ph.D., NHLBI

 

Measurement of mechanisms of immune function with the ImageStream imaging flow cytometry will be explored through the experiences of several prominent speakers. A diverse range of topics will be covered, including immune response to viral infection, phagocytosis of fungal pathogens, trafficking of antigens, and effector mechanisms of therapeutic antibody-induced tumor clearance.

Antibody-based Detection of Cytokine Expression Profiles: Arrays of Possibilities

RayBiotech, Inc.

11:00 AM 12:00 PM, Room 312

Presenter: Brett Burkholder, Director, Tech Support & Marketing, RayBiotech, Inc.

 

Cytokine biology is often too complex to unravel using traditional techniques of molecular biology. Cytokines commonly work synergistically or antagonistically with other cytokines, with overlapping functions and cross-talk among cytokines being the rules rather than the exceptions. Therefore, using traditional ELISA or Western-blot analysis to measure changes in just a few cytokines can give an incomplete picture of the role of these proteins in an experimental model. Cytokine antibody arrays are multiplexed assays that can measure changes in expression of hundreds of cytokines simultaneously, allowing researchers to obtain a more global perspective on cytokine expression compared to traditional approaches. An overview of cytokine array technologies will be presented, as well as specific examples of how cytokine antibody arrays can be used to identify biomarkers, key factors, and drug targets and to elucidate biochemical mechanisms and pathways.

Fast and Versatile Isolation of Highly Functional Regulatory T Cells

STEMCELL Technologies, Inc.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM, Room 311

Presenter: Andy Kokaji, Ph.D., Scientist, STEMCELL Technologies

 

The first step towards quality regulatory T cell (Treg) research is the isolation of highly purified, functional cells. Learn how to obtain the highest purity Tregs directly from whole blood or PBMC in less time with STEMCELLs new range of products for the rapid and efficient isolation of human Tregs. This workshop will demonstrate how you can get your desired population of Tregs based on expression of CD25, CD127, CD49d, and CD45RA, while saving hours on the isolation procedure. Purified cells are highly functional and ready for downstream Treg assays.

New Inflammation and Cytokine Research Technologies: From Expression to Mechanism

SABiosciences Corporation, a QIAGEN Company

12:00 PM 1:00 PM Room 312

Presenter: Brian McNally, Associate Product Manager, SABiosciences

 

SABiosciences, a QIAGEN company, has developed pathway-focused tools for investigating inflammation, infection and autoimmunity. This seminar will present case studies that measured gene expression and pathway activity and yielded mechanistic insights into the underlying biological system. Learn how PCR Arrays, ELISArrays, Cignal Reporters and Biology-on-Array will enhance immunology research.

Control of the Inflammatory Response of Primary Human Macrophages by Microstructures and Surface Chemistry

eBioscience, Inc.

2:00 PM 3:00 PM, Room 312

Presenter: Matthias Bartneck, Dipl.-Biol., Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research œBioMAT

 

Fluorinated polymers and gold nanoparticles are regarded as biocompatible materials and therefore are used as model materials to study the inflammatory response of macrophages. Topics to be covered include expression of inflammation-relevant genes, determining phenotype using real-time PCR and flow cytometry, and quantifying multiple cytokines from cell culture using the eBioscience Flowcytomix multiple analyte detection system.

Sensitive Rare Cell Enumeration and Whole

Blood Analysis Using the MACSQuant Analyzer

Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.

3:00 PM 4:00 PM, Room 311

Presenter: Colin deBakker, Ph.D., Flow Cytometry Specialist, Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.

 

Detection and enumeration of rare cells using a flow cytometer has limitations. To overcome some obstacles, the MACSQuant Analyzer was designed with unique features, including a pump-driven fluidic system and a MACS Cell Enrichment Unit for magnetic pre-enrichment of target cells. This workshop will illustrate the simplicity of detecting and enumerating rare cells with application for multiple cell sources, including whole blood.

MONDAY, MAY 10

Considerations in Cytokine Assay Development
PBL InterferonSource
11:00 AM 12:00 PM, Room 311
Presenter: Thomas Lavoie, Ph.D., Director of Product Development, PBL InterferonSource


This tutorial will provide information on how to set up cytokine assays with appropriate controls, tips and tricks for optimizing results, and how to make sense of the generated data. Topics such as choosing appropriate methods and standards and data analysis will also be covered.
Patenting Immunotechnology: Issues In Obtaining Protection To Help You Successfully Market Your Inventions
Sughrue Mion, PLLC
1:00 PM 2:00 PM, Room 311
Presenter: William J. Simmons, Ph.D., Tu Phan-Kerr, Ph.D., Larry Helms, Ph.D.*
* invited, Supervisory Patent Examiner, United States Patent Office

The focused panel workshop will discuss current issues encountered in patenting immunology inventions, including immunoregulatory proteins, antibodies and immune cells and includes insights from within the US Patent Office.
BLOCK SYMPOSIA
Submitted abstracts are programmed into oral or poster sessions; oral sessions are called Block Symposia. Each abstract selected for a Block Symposium will also be presented in a Poster Session. Approximately 50 Block Symposia will be presented at IMMUNOLOGY 2010.
View IMMUNOLOGY 2010 Block Symposia Schedule

View IMMUNOLOGY 2010 Block Symposia Session Detail

View IMMUNOLOGY 2010 Abstract Submission Topic Categories.
POSTER SESSIONS

The most interactive part of the meeting! Discuss data and research issues firsthand with authors at the Poster Sessions. Posters will be displayed Saturday through Monday in the Baltimore Convention Center Exhibit Hall from 9:00 AM 4:30 PM, with authors present from 12:30 1:30 PM. Authors will be allowed access to the hall to place their posters at 8:00 AM.

View IMMUNOLOGY 2010 Poster Session Schedule
 

EXHIBITOR PRODUCT SHOWCASE
Featuring hands-on demonstration of products shown on the exhibit floor.

SATURDAY, MAY 8

10:30 AM

eBioscience, Inc.

Instant ELISA TechnologyA Revolution of the Established Sandwich ELISA: The Instant ELISA plate already contains all necessary components just add your samples! 128 tests per kit include 96 wells for samples. See for yourself: Instant ELISAs are incomparably fast and simple to set up and unmatched in their reproducibility!

11:00 AM
Accuriź Cytometers, Inc.

Accuri Cytometers will demonstrate the C6 Flow Cytometer System. The non-pressurized C6 works with a variety of sample tubes and has pre-optimized detector settings and an increased dynamic range of over 6 decades, providing complete flexibility to display and analyze data post-collection without any alteration of your original data files.

1:45 PM

InvivoGen

InvivoGen offers a high-throughput service to determine whether a compound is recognized by TLRs or NOD1/NOD2 and acts either as an agonist or antagonist. The method utilizes a panel of engineered HEK293 cells that in the presence of a TLR or NOD ligand will express the SEAP reporter gene.

2:15 PM

Advanced Targeting Systems, Inc.

ATSs second immunotoxins use saporin attached to a secondary antibody to œpiggyback onto your primary antibody in order to evaluate the ability of the primary antibody to bind to an extracellular marker and internalize. Once internalized, saporin will inactivate the ribosomes of the cell, thereby causing cell death.

3:15 PM

Invitrogen Corporation

Non-human primates are crucial model systems in a number of areas of biomedical research. Using the Luminex xMAP platform, Life Technologies has developed a 28-plex magnetic bead-based cytokine immunoassay for the analysis of Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) samples.

SUNDAY, MAY 9

9:30 AM

Quidelź Corporation

Reliable, convenient ELISA for detecting C3a in human plasma and serum: Elevated levels of C3a have been associated with a variety of disease states including ischemic heart disease and several autoimmune diseases (including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosis). The MicroVueTM C3a Plus Kit is standardized using ultra-pure, highly characterized C3a protein. It includes convenient, ready-to-use standards and a highly specific proprietary monoclonal antibody to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

10:30 AM

Enzo Life Sciences, Inc.

The Neutrophil Elastase Colorimetric Drug Discovery Kit is a complete assay system for measuring activity of recombinant neutrophil elastase, a serine protease involved in the innate immune response, with roles in the degradation of microorganisms, and up-regulation and degradation of cytokines. The kits utility for screening inhibitors of this interesting target will be presented.

11:00 AM

PBL InterferonSource

PBL will showcase the new VeriPlex Human Interferon Multiarray ELISA, the first multiplex system to simultaneously quantify Types I, II, and III interferons in different sample matrices, allowing the researcher to perform interferon profiling in various autoimmune and infectious disease states.

1:45 PM

eBioscience, Inc.

Instant ELISA TechnologyA Revolution of the Established Sandwich ELISA: The Instant ELISA plate already contains all necessary componentsjust add your samples! 128 tests per kit include 96 wells for samples. See for yourself: Instant ELISAs are incomparably fast and simple to set up and unmatched in their reproducibility!

2:45 PM

Siloam Biosciences, Inc.

Discover how the Optimiser, the next generation in microplates, can improve your immunoassays. The Optimiser provides the versatility to extend the value of your samples, maximize the sensitivity of your assays, and increase the throughput of your lab with decreased assay time.

MONDAY, MAY 10

11:00 AM

Invitrogen Corporation

Applied Biosystems is proud to introduce the new ViiATM 7 Real-Time PCR system, the biggest advance in qPCR since the q. ViiATM 7 offers a simplified workflow, interchangeable blocks, intuitive software, a touch-screen interface, and one-button protocols. Full compatibility with TaqMan reagents and Custom Array cards puts high productivity real-time PCR within anyones grasp.



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